Shelter From The Storm


 
AccueilAccueil  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Dylan parle

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
AuteurMessage
Moonwatcher
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 510
Age : 25
Date d'inscription : 23/07/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Sam 7 Fév - 19:14

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Baptiste
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2507
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2006

MessageSujet: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 0:31

La vache.
J'ai l'impression qu'il s'est passé un truc monstrueux, là.
J'ai pas encore trouvé la retranscription totale de ce qu'il a dit, mais ça ressemble à un grand grand numéro Dylanien.


Citation :
"Critics say I slur my words and have no diction ... that I mumble and render my songs un-listenable. Oh. really?"

_________________
Sing along Bob
Sing, sing along Zimmerman
J'suis cow-boy à Paname
Mais c'est la faute à Dylan
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Desmos
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1494
Age : 23
Localisation : Le pays des vaches, Normandie
Date d'inscription : 20/12/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 2:34

Putain...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Desmos
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1494
Age : 23
Localisation : Le pays des vaches, Normandie
Date d'inscription : 20/12/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 2:36

“Johnny was an intense character, and he saw that people were putting me down. Playing electric music. And he posted letters to magazines, scolding people, telling them to shut up and let him sing. In Johnny Cash’s world of hardcore Southern drama, that kind of thing didn’t exist. Nobody told anybody what to sing or what not to sing. Critics didn’t do that kind of thing.

“I’ve always got to thank him for doing that. Johnny Cash was a giant of a man. The Man in Black. And I’ll always cherish the friendship we had until the day there is no more days.”

C'est juste beau
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Soledad
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2019
Age : 24
Localisation : Banlieue parisienne
Date d'inscription : 28/02/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 11:07

J'ai l'impression que c'est vraiment une chance de vivre la fin de la carrière de Dylan, il se dévoile de plus en plus c'est assez émouvant.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
vox populi
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1969
Date d'inscription : 09/05/2009

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 11:27

Quelqu'un peut résumer les points important du discours en Français?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Baptiste
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2507
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 12:42


_________________
Sing along Bob
Sing, sing along Zimmerman
J'suis cow-boy à Paname
Mais c'est la faute à Dylan
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
used_spoon
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2136
Age : 26
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2011

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 13:04

Transcription complète : http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-grammys-2015-transcript-of-bob-dylans-musicares-person-of-year-speech-20150207-story.html#page=3


C'est passionant : Hommages, Critiques, Dieu, Écriture.

Si quelqu'un à la vidéo...


Citation :
Oh, yeah. Critics have been giving me a hard time since Day One. Critics say I can't sing. I croak. Sound like a frog. Why don't critics say that same thing about Tom Waits? Critics say my voice is shot. That I have no voice. What don't they say those things about Leonard Cohen? Why do I get special treatment? Critics say I can't carry a tune and I talk my way through a song. Really? I've never heard that said about Lou Reed. Why does he get to go scot-free?


What have I done to deserve this special attention? No vocal range? When's the last time you heard Dr. John? Why don't you say that about him? Slur my words, got no diction. Have you people ever listened to Charley Patton or Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters. Talk about slurred words and no diction. [Inaudible] doesn't even matter.

"Why me, Lord?" I would say that to myself.

Critics say I mangle my melodies, render my songs unrecognizable. Oh, really? Let me tell you something. I was at a boxing match a few years ago seeing Floyd Mayweather fight a Puerto Rican guy. And the Puerto Rican national anthem, somebody sang it and it was beautiful. It was heartfelt and it was moving.


Bim.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Moonwatcher
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 510
Age : 25
Date d'inscription : 23/07/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 13:59

Pour la première fois il admets plus ou moins ouvertement, et en public, qu'il a beaucoup puisé chez les autres pour écrire ses chansons.
C'est vraiment étonnant.

J'attends le discours du Nobel avec impatience.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
used_spoon
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2136
Age : 26
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2011

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 15:17



Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Jack Fate
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 918
Age : 37
Date d'inscription : 21/07/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 15:31

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Oyster
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 9031
Localisation : In the pines
Date d'inscription : 19/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 15:37

Baptiste a écrit:

Il va finir par se présenter aux élections, je vous le dis.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
hazel
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2796
Age : 27
Localisation : Rennes
Date d'inscription : 16/01/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 17:49

Tout cela me donne des frissons et m'excite bien plus que le dernier album.
Dis-leur Bob, lâches-toi. Very Happy

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://dylanesque.cowblog.fr/
Sherpa
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 382
Localisation : Suisse
Date d'inscription : 30/01/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 19:55

Étonnant et excitant en effet! Un tel discours de sa part lors d'une cérémonie est juste exceptionnel!
Peut-être que le temps est venu pour lui d'ouvrir la boite de Pandore!
Toutes ses récentes déclarations et interview me rendent encore plus impatient de lire le vol. 2 de ses "Chronicles"!!

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
hazel
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2796
Age : 27
Localisation : Rennes
Date d'inscription : 16/01/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 20:30

Le discours en entier (faudrait que je le traduise si j'ai le temps) :

I'm glad for my songs to be honored like this. But you know, they didn't get here by themselves. It's been a long road and it's taken a lot of doing. These songs of mine, they're like mystery stories, the kind that Shakespeare saw when he was growing up. I think you could trace what I do back that far. They were on the fringes then, and I think they're on the fringes now. And they sound like they've been on the hard ground.

I should mention a few people along the way who brought this about. I know I should mention John Hammond, great talent scout for Columbia Records. He signed me to that label when I was nobody. It took a lot of faith to do that, and he took a lot of ridicule, but he was his own man and he was courageous. And for that, I'm eternally grateful. The last person he discovered before me was Aretha Franklin, and before that Count Basie, Billie Holiday and a whole lot of other artists. All noncommercial artists.

Trends did not interest John, and I was very noncommercial but he stayed with me. He believed in my talent and that's all that mattered. I can't thank him enough for that.

Lou Levy runs Leeds Music, and they published my earliest songs, but I didn't stay there too long. Levy himself, he went back a long ways. He signed me to that company and recorded my songs and I sang them into a tape recorder. He told me outright, there was no precedent for what I was doing, that I was either before my time or behind it. And if I brought him a song like "Stardust," he'd turn it down because it would be too late.

He told me that if I was before my time -- and he didn't really know that for sure -- but if it was happening and if it was true, the public would usually take three to five years to catch up -- so be prepared. And that did happen. The trouble was, when the public did catch up I was already three to five years beyond that, so it kind of complicated it. But he was encouraging, and he didn't judge me, and I'll always remember him for that.

Artie Mogull at Witmark Music signed me next to his company, and he told me to just keep writing songs no matter what, that I might be on to something. Well, he too stood behind me, and he could never wait to see what I'd give him next. I didn't even think of myself as a songwriter before then. I'll always be grateful for him also for that attitude.

I also have to mention some of the early artists who recorded my songs very, very early, without having to be asked. Just something they felt about them that was right for them. I've got to say thank you to Peter, Paul and Mary, who I knew all separately before they ever became a group. I didn't even think of myself as writing songs for others to sing but it was starting to happen and it couldn't have happened to, or with, a better group.

They took a song of mine that had been recorded before that was buried on one of my records and turned it into a hit song. Not the way I would have done it -- they straightened it out. But since then hundreds of people have recorded it and I don't think that would have happened if it wasn't for them. They definitely started something for me.

The Byrds, the Turtles, Sonny & Cher -- they made some of my songs Top 10 hits but I wasn't a pop songwriter and I really didn't want to be that, but it was good that it happened. Their versions of songs were like commercials, but I didn't really mind that because 50 years later my songs were being used in the commercials. So that was good too. I was glad it happened, and I was glad they'd done it.

Pervis Staples and the Staple Singers -- long before they were on Stax they were on Epic and they were one of my favorite groups of all time. I met them all in '62 or '63. They heard my songs live and Pervis wanted to record three or four of them and he did with the Staples Singers. They were the type of artists that I wanted recording my songs.

Nina Simone. I used to cross paths with her in New York City in the Village Gate nightclub. These were the artists I looked up to. She recorded some of my songs that she [inaudible] to me. She was an overwhelming artist, piano player and singer. Very strong woman, very outspoken. That she was recording my songs validated everything that I was about.

Oh, and can't forget Jimi Hendrix. I actually saw Jimi Hendrix perform when he was in a band called Jimmy James and the Blue Flames -- something like that. And Jimi didn't even sing. He was just the guitar player. He took some small songs of mine that nobody paid any attention to and pumped them up into the outer limits of the stratosphere and turned them all into classics. I have to thank Jimi, too. I wish he was here.

Johnny Cash recorded some of my songs early on, too, up in about '63, when he was all skin and bones. He traveled long, he traveled hard, but he was a hero of mine. I heard many of his songs growing up. I knew them better than I knew my own. "Big River," "I Walk the Line."

"How high's the water, Mama?" I wrote "It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" with that song reverberating inside my head. I still ask, "How high is the water, mama?" Johnny was an intense character. And he saw that people were putting me down playing electric music, and he posted letters to magazines scolding people, telling them to shut up and let him sing.

In Johnny Cash's world -- hardcore Southern drama -- that kind of thing didn't exist. Nobody told anybody what to sing or what not to sing. They just didn't do that kind of thing. I'm always going to thank him for that. Johnny Cash was a giant of a man, the man in black. And I'll always cherish the friendship we had until the day there is no more days.

Oh, and I'd be remiss if I didn't mention Joan Baez. She was the queen of folk music then and now. She took a liking to my songs and brought me with her to play concerts, where she had crowds of thousands of people enthralled with her beauty and voice.

People would say, "What are you doing with that ragtag scrubby little waif?" And she'd tell everybody in no uncertain terms, "Now you better be quiet and listen to the songs." We even played a few of them together. Joan Baez is as tough-minded as they come. Love. And she's a free, independent spirit. Nobody can tell her what to do if she doesn't want to do it. I learned a lot of things from her. A woman with devastating honesty. And for her kind of love and devotion, I could never pay that back.

These songs didn't come out of thin air. I didn't just make them up out of whole cloth. Contrary to what Lou Levy said, there was a precedent. It all came out of traditional music: traditional folk music, traditional rock 'n' roll and traditional big-band swing orchestra music.

I learned lyrics and how to write them from listening to folk songs. And I played them, and I met other people that played them back when nobody was doing it. Sang nothing but these folk songs, and they gave me the code for everything that's fair game, that everything belongs to everyone.

For three or four years all I listened to were folk standards. I went to sleep singing folk songs. I sang them everywhere, clubs, parties, bars, coffeehouses, fields, festivals. And I met other singers along the way who did the same thing and we just learned songs from each other. I could learn one song and sing it next in an hour if I'd heard it just once.

If you sang "John Henry" as many times as me -- "John Henry was a steel-driving man / Died with a hammer in his hand / John Henry said a man ain't nothin' but a man / Before I let that steam drill drive me down / I'll die with that hammer in my hand."

If you had sung that song as many times as I did, you'd have written "How many roads must a man walk down?" too.

Big Bill Broonzy had a song called "Key to the Highway." "I've got a key to the highway / I'm booked and I'm bound to go / Gonna leave here runnin' because walking is most too slow." I sang that a lot. If you sing that a lot, you just might write,

Georgia Sam he had a bloody nose
Welfare Department they wouldn’t give him no clothes
He asked poor Howard where can I go
Howard said there’s only one place I know
Sam said tell me quick man I got to run
Howard just pointed with his gun
And said that way down on Highway 61

You'd have written that too if you'd sang "Key to the Highway" as much as me.

"Ain't no use sit 'n cry / You'll be an angel by and by / Sail away, ladies, sail away." "I'm sailing away my own true love." "Boots of Spanish Leather" -- Sheryl Crow just sung that.

"Roll the cotton down, aw, yeah, roll the cotton down / Ten dollars a day is a white man's pay / A dollar a day is the black man's pay / Roll the cotton down." If you sang that song as many times as me, you'd be writing "I ain't gonna work on Maggie's farm no more," too.

I sang a lot of "come all you" songs. There's plenty of them. There's way too many to be counted. "Come along boys and listen to my tale / Tell you of my trouble on the old Chisholm Trail." Or, "Come all ye good people, listen while I tell / the fate of Floyd Collins a lad we all know well / The fate of Floyd Collins, a lad we all know well."

"Come all ye fair and tender ladies / Take warning how you court your men / They're like a star on a summer morning / They first appear and then they're gone again." "If you'll gather 'round, people / A story I will tell / 'Bout Pretty Boy Floyd, an outlaw / Oklahoma knew him well."

If you sung all these "come all ye" songs all the time, you'd be writing, "Come gather 'round people where ever you roam, admit that the waters around you have grown / Accept that soon you'll be drenched to the bone / If your time to you is worth saving / And you better start swimming or you'll sink like a stone / The times they are a-changing."

You'd have written them too. There's nothing secret about it. You just do it subliminally and unconsciously, because that's all enough, and that's all I sang. That was all that was dear to me. They were the only kinds of songs that made sense.

"When you go down to Deep Ellum keep your money in your socks / Women in Deep Ellum put you on the rocks." Sing that song for a while and you just might come up with, "When you're lost in the rain in Juarez and it's Easter time too / And your gravity fails and negativity don't pull you through / Don’t put on any airs / When you’re down on Rue Morgue Avenue / They got some hungry women there / And they really make a mess outta you."

All these songs are connected. Don't be fooled. I just opened up a different door in a different kind of way. It's just different, saying the same thing. I didn't think it was anything out of the ordinary.

Well you know, I just thought I was doing something natural, but right from the start, my songs were divisive for some reason. They divided people. I never knew why. Some got angered, others loved them. Didn't know why my songs had detractors and supporters. A strange environment to have to throw your songs into, but I did it anyway.

Last thing I thought of was who cared about what song I was writing. I was just writing them. I didn't think I was doing anything different. I thought I was just extending the line. Maybe a little bit unruly, but I was just elaborating on situations. Maybe hard to pin down, but so what? A lot of people are hard to pin down. You've just got to bear it. I didn't really care what Lieber and Stoller thought of my songs.

They didn't like 'em, but Doc Pomus did. That was all right that they didn't like 'em, because I never liked their songs either. "Yakety yak, don't talk back." "Charlie Brown is a clown," "Baby I'm a hog for you." Novelty songs. They weren't saying anything serious. Doc's songs, they were better. "This Magic Moment." "Lonely Avenue." Save the Last Dance for Me.

Those songs broke my heart. I figured I'd rather have his blessings any day than theirs.

Ahmet Ertegun didn't think much of my songs, but Sam Phillips did. Ahmet founded Atlantic Records. He produced some great records: Ray Charles, Ray Brown, just to name a few.

There were some great records in there, no question about it. But Sam Phillips, he recorded Elvis and Jerry Lee, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash. Radical eyes that shook the very essence of humanity. Revolution in style and scope. Heavy shape and color. Radical to the bone. Songs that cut you to the bone. Renegades in all degrees, doing songs that would never decay, and still resound to this day. Oh, yeah, I'd rather have Sam Phillips' blessing any day.

Merle Haggard didn't even think much of my songs. I know he didn't. He didn't say that to me, but I know [inaudible]. Buck Owens did, and he recorded some of my early songs. Merle Haggard -- "Mama Tried," "The Bottle Let Me Down," "I'm a Lonesome Fugitive." I can't imagine Waylon Jennings singing "The Bottle Let Me Down."

"Together Again"? That's Buck Owens, and that trumps anything coming out of Bakersfield. Buck Owens and Merle Haggard? If you have to have somebody's blessing -- you figure it out.

Oh, yeah. Critics have been giving me a hard time since Day One. Critics say I can't sing. I croak. Sound like a frog. Why don't critics say that same thing about Tom Waits? Critics say my voice is shot. That I have no voice. What don't they say those things about Leonard Cohen? Why do I get special treatment? Critics say I can't carry a tune and I talk my way through a song. Really? I've never heard that said about Lou Reed. Why does he get to go scot-free?

What have I done to deserve this special attention? No vocal range? When's the last time you heard Dr. John? Why don't you say that about him? Slur my words, got no diction. Have you people ever listened to Charley Patton or Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters. Talk about slurred words and no diction. [Inaudible] doesn't even matter.

"Why me, Lord?" I would say that to myself.

Critics say I mangle my melodies, render my songs unrecognizable. Oh, really? Let me tell you something. I was at a boxing match a few years ago seeing Floyd Mayweather fight a Puerto Rican guy. And the Puerto Rican national anthem, somebody sang it and it was beautiful. It was heartfelt and it was moving.

After that it was time for our national anthem. And a very popular soul-singing sister was chosen to sing. She sang every note -- that exists, and some that don't exist. Talk about mangling a melody. You take a one-syllable word and make it last for 15 minutes? She was doing vocal gymnastics like she was on a trapeze act. But to me it was not funny.

Where were the critics? Mangling lyrics? Mangling a melody? Mangling a treasured song? No, I get the blame. But I don't really think I do that. I just think critics say I do.

Sam Cooke said this when told he had a beautiful voice: He said, "Well that's very kind of you, but voices ought not to be measured by how pretty they are. Instead they matter only if they convince you that they are telling the truth." Think about that the next time you [inaudible].

Times always change. They really do. And you have to always be ready for something that's coming along and you never expected it. Way back when, I was in Nashville making some records and I read this article, a Tom T. Hall interview. Tom T. Hall, he was bitching about some kind of new song, and he couldn't understand what these new kinds of songs that were coming in were about.

Now Tom, he was one of the most preeminent songwriters of the time in Nashville. A lot of people were recording his songs and he himself even did it. But he was all in a fuss about James Taylor, a song James had called "Country Road." Tom was going off in this interview -- "But James don't say nothing about a country road. He's just says how you can feel it on the country road. I don't understand that."

Now some might say Tom is a great songwriter. I'm not going to doubt that. At the time he was doing this interview I was actually listening to a song of his on the radio.

It was called "I Love." I was listening to it in a recording studio, and he was talking about all the things he loves, an everyman kind of song, trying to connect with people. Trying to make you think that he's just like you and you're just like him. We all love the same things, and we're all in this together. Tom loves little baby ducks, slow-moving trains and rain. He loves old pickup trucks and little country streams. Sleeping without dreams. Bourbon in a glass. Coffee in a cup. Tomatoes on the vine, and onions.

Now listen, I'm not ever going to disparage another songwriter. I'm not going to do that. I'm not saying it's a bad song. I'm just saying it might be a little overcooked. But, you know, it was in the top 10 anyway. Tom and a few other writers had the whole Nashville scene sewed up in a box. If you wanted to record a song and get it in the top 10 you had to go to them, and Tom was one of the top guys. They were all very comfortable, doing their thing.

This was about the time that Willie Nelson picked up and moved to Texas. About the same time. He's still in Texas. Everything was very copacetic. Everything was all right until -- until -- Kristofferson came to town. Oh, they ain't seen anybody like him. He came into town like a wildcat, flew his helicopter into Johnny Cash's backyard like a typical songwriter. And he went for the throat. "Sunday Morning Coming Down."

Well, I woke up Sunday morning
With no way to hold my head that didn't hurt.
And the beer I had for breakfast wasn't bad
So I had one more for dessert
Then I fumbled through my closet
Found my cleanest dirty shirt
Then I washed my face and combed my hair
And stumbled down the stairs to meet the day.

You can look at Nashville pre-Kris and post-Kris, because he changed everything. That one song ruined Tom T. Hall's poker parties. It might have sent him to the crazy house. God forbid he ever heard any of my songs.

You walk into the room
With your pencil in your hand
You see somebody naked
You say, “Who is that man?”
You try so hard
But you don’t understand
Just what you're gonna say
When you get home
You know something is happening here
But you don’t know what it is
Do you, Mister Jones?

If "Sunday Morning Coming Down" rattled Tom's cage, sent him into the looney bin, my song surely would have made him blow his brains out, right there in the minivan. Hopefully he didn't hear it.

I just released an album of standards, all the songs usually done by Michael Buble, Harry Connick Jr., maybe Brian Wilson's done a couple, Linda Ronstadt done 'em. But the reviews of their records are different than the reviews of my record.

In their reviews no one says anything. In my reviews, [inaudible] they've got to look under every stone when it comes to me. They've got to mention all the songwriters' names. Well that's OK with me. After all, they're great songwriters and these are standards. I've seen the reviews come in, and they'll mention all the songwriters in half the review, as if everybody knows them. Nobody's heard of them, not in this time, anyway. Buddy Kaye, Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh, to name a few.

But, you know, I'm glad they mention their names, and you know what? I'm glad they got their names in the press. It might have taken some time to do it, but they're finally there. I can only wonder why it took so long. My only regret is that they're not here to see it.

Traditional rock 'n' roll, we're talking about that. It's all about rhythm. Johnny Cash said it best: "Get rhythm. Get rhythm when you get the blues." Very few rock 'n' roll bands today play with rhythm. They don't know what it is. Rock 'n' roll is a combination of blues, and it's a strange thing made up of two parts. A lot of people don't know this, but the blues, which is an American music, is not what you think it is. It's a combination of Arabic violins and Strauss waltzes working it out. But it's true.

The other half of rock 'n' roll has got to be hillbilly. And that's a derogatory term, but it ought not to be. That's a term that includes the Delmore Bros., Stanley Bros., Roscoe Holcomb, Clarence Ashley ... groups like that. Moonshiners gone berserk. Fast cars on dirt roads. That's the kind of combination that makes up rock 'n' roll, and it can't be cooked up in a science laboratory or a studio.

You have to have the right kind of rhythm to play this kind of music. If you can't hardly play the blues, how do you [inaudible] those other two kinds of music in there? You can fake it, but you can't really do it.

Critics have made a career out of accusing me of having a career of confounding expectations. Really? Because that's all I do. That's how I think about it. Confounding expectations.

"What do you do for a living, man?"

"Oh, I confound expectations."

You're going to get a job, the man says, "What do you do?" "Oh, confound expectations.: And the man says, "Well, we already have that spot filled. Call us back. Or don't call us, we'll call you." Confounding expectations. What does that mean? 'Why me, Lord? I'd confound them, but I don't know how to do it.'

The Blackwood Bros. have been talking to me about making a record together. That might confound expectations, but it shouldn't. Of course it would be a gospel album. I don't think it would be anything out of the ordinary for me. Not a bit. One of the songs I'm thinking about singing is "Stand By Me" by the Blackwood Brothers. Not "Stand By Me" the pop song. No. The real "Stand By Me."

The real one goes like this:

When the storm of life is raging / Stand by me / When the storm of life is raging / Stand by me / When the world is tossing me / Like a ship upon the sea / Thou who rulest wind and water / Stand by me

In the midst of tribulation / Stand by me / In the midst of tribulation / Stand by me / When the hosts of hell assail / And my strength begins to fail / Thou who never lost a battle / Stand by me

In the midst of faults and failures / Stand by me / In the midst of faults and failures / Stand by me / When I do the best I can / And my friends don't understand / Thou who knowest all about me / Stand by me

That's the song. I like it better than the pop song. If I record one by that name, that's going to be the one. I'm also thinking of recording a song, not on that album, though: "Oh Lord, Please Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood."

Anyway, why me, Lord. What did I do?

Anyway, I'm proud to be here tonight for MusiCares. I'm honored to have all these artists singing my songs. There's nothing like that. Great artists. [applause, inaudible]. They're all singing the truth, and you can hear it in their voices.

I'm proud to be here tonight for MusiCares. I think a lot of this organization. They've helped many people. Many musicians who have contributed a lot to our culture. I'd like to personally thank them for what they did for a friend of mine, Billy Lee Riley. A friend of mine who they helped for six years when he was down and couldn't work. Billy was a son of rock 'n' roll, obviously.

He was a true original. He did it all: He played, he sang, he wrote. He would have been a bigger star but Jerry Lee came along. And you know what happens when someone like that comes along. You just don't stand a chance.

So Billy became what is known in the industry -- a condescending term, by the way -- as a one-hit wonder. But sometimes, just sometimes, once in a while, a one-hit wonder can make a more powerful impact than a recording star who's got 20 or 30 hits behind him. And Billy's hit song was called "Red Hot," and it was red hot. It could blast you out of your skull and make you feel happy about it. Change your life.

He did it with style and grace. You won't find him in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He's not there. Metallica is. Abba is. Mamas and the Papas -- I know they're in there. Jefferson Airplane, Alice Cooper, Steely Dan -- I've got nothing against them. Soft rock, hard rock, psychedelic pop. I got nothing against any of that stuff, but after all, it is called the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Billy Lee Riley is not there. Yet.

I'd see him a couple times a year and we'd always spent time together and he was on a rockabilly festival nostalgia circuit, and we'd cross paths now and again. We'd always spend time together. He was a hero of mine. I'd heard "Red Hot." I must have been only 15 or 16 when I did and it's impressed me to this day.

I never grow tired of listening to it. Never got tired of watching Billy Lee perform, either. We spent time together just talking and playing into the night. He was a deep, truthful man. He wasn't bitter or nostalgic. He just accepted it. He knew where he had come from and he was content with who he was.

And then one day he got sick. And like my friend John Mellencamp would sing -- because John sang some truth today -- one day you get sick and you don't get better. That's from a song of his called "Life is Short Even on Its Longest Days." It's one of the better songs of the last few years, actually. I ain't lying.

And I ain't lying when I tell you that MusiCares paid for my friend's doctor bills, and helped him to get spending money. They were able to at least make his life comfortable, tolerable to the end. That is something that can't be repaid. Any organization that would do that would have to have my blessing.

I'm going to get out of here now. I'm going to put an egg in my shoe and beat it. I probably left out a lot of people and said too much about some. But that's OK. Like the spiritual song, 'I'm still just crossing over Jordan too.' Let's hope we meet again. Sometime. And we will, if, like Hank Williams said, "the good Lord willing and the creek don't rise."

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://dylanesque.cowblog.fr/
Baptiste
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2507
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Dim 8 Fév - 22:47

Quelques extraits des reprises jouées...



Celle de Jack White a l'air cool.
Et on voit Bob parler  Embarassed

Ça sent le DVD, avec le speech du Zim en bonus.

_________________
Sing along Bob
Sing, sing along Zimmerman
J'suis cow-boy à Paname
Mais c'est la faute à Dylan
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
JeffreyLeePierre
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2699
Age : 51
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 06/01/2011

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Lun 9 Fév - 2:20

Hop là : un dimanche soir, au lieu de rien faire, une traduction. N'hésitez pas à corriger, j'ai dû faire au moins deux contre-sens.
Et au premier paragraphe, j'ai laissé [terre ingrate] entre crochets. Je ne sais pas comment traduire, ça doit être une expression mais ça ne m'est pas revenu.
(Sans parler de l'impossibilité de rendre le verbe dylanien, mais ça, j'espérais même pas)

Bref. J'ai laissé chaque paragraphe en anglais au dessus, pour ceussent qui veulent vérifier, ou relire l'original après avoir vu de quoi ça cause.
Je n'ai pas traduit les paroles de chansons, encore moins les titres, sauf très marginalement (le jeu de mot sur "red hot").

---------------------------------------------------------
I'm glad for my songs to be honored like this. But you know, they didn't get here by themselves. It's been a long road and it's taken a lot of doing. These songs of mine, they're like mystery stories, the kind that Shakespeare saw when he was growing up. I think you could trace what I do back that far. They were on the fringes then, and I think they're on the fringes now. And they sound like they've been on the hard ground.
Je suis content que mes chansons soient honorées ainsi. Mais vous savez, elles ne sont pas venues toutes seules. Ça a été un long chemin et ça a été beaucoup de travail. Mes chansons sont comme des histoires à énigmes, le genre que Shakespeare a pu voir pendant qu'il grandissait. Je pense que vous pourriez remonter aussi loin pour retrouver ce que je fais. Elles étaient marginales, et je pense qu'elles sont encore marginales. Et elles sonnent comme si elles venaient d'une [terre ingrate].

I should mention a few people along the way who brought this about. I know I should mention John Hammond, great talent scout for Columbia Records. He signed me to that label when I was nobody. It took a lot of faith to do that, and he took a lot of ridicule, but he was his own man and he was courageous. And for that, I'm eternally grateful. The last person he discovered before me was Aretha Franklin, and before that Count Basie, Billie Holiday and a whole lot of other artists. All noncommercial artists.
Je voudrais citer quelques personnes qui ont permis à tout cela d'arriver. Je sais que je dois mentionner John Hammond, grand découvreur de talents chez Columbia Records. Il m'a signé sur ce label quand je n'étais encore personne. Il fallait avoir beaucoup de foi pour le faire, et il y a gagné beaucoup de ridicule, mais il ne suivait que son propre avis et il était courageux. Et pour cela, je lui suis éternellement reconnaissant. Le dernière personne qu'il avait découvert avant moi était Aretha Franklin, et avant ça Count Basie, Billie Holiday et deaucoup d'autres artistes. Tous non commerciaux.

Trends did not interest John, and I was very noncommercial but he stayed with me. He believed in my talent and that's all that mattered. I can't thank him enough for that.
Les modes n'intéressaient pas John,  et j'étais très anti-commercial mais il m'a soutenu. Il croyait en mon talent et c'est tout ce qui comptait pour lui. je ne pourrai jamais assez l'en remercier.

Lou Levy runs Leeds Music, and they published my earliest songs, but I didn't stay there too long. Levy himself, he went back a long ways. He signed me to that company and recorded my songs and I sang them into a tape recorder. He told me outright, there was no precedent for what I was doing, that I was either before my time or behind it. And if I brought him a song like "Stardust," he'd turn it down because it would be too late.
Lou Levy dirige Leeds Music, et ils publièrent mes premières chansons, mais je n'y suis pas resté très longtemps. Levy lui-même, il venait de loin. Il m'a signé chez cet éditeur et enregistra mes chansons que je chantais sur un magnétophone. Il me dit carrément que rien ne ressemblait à ce que je faisais, que j'étais soit en avance sur mon temps ou en retard. Et si je lui amenais une chanson comme "Stardust", il la rejetait parce était ringarde.

He told me that if I was before my time -- and he didn't really know that for sure -- but if it was happening and if it was true, the public would usually take three to five years to catch up -- so be prepared. And that did happen. The trouble was, when the public did catch up I was already three to five years beyond that, so it kind of complicated it. But he was encouraging, and he didn't judge me, and I'll always remember him for that.
Il m'a dit que j'étais en avance sur mon temps (et il n'en était pas certain) mais si cela finissait par arriver et s'il avait raison, le public mettrait 3 ou 5 ans à adhérer (et donc de m'y préparer). Et c'est arrivé. Le problème, c'est que le temps que le public y arrive, j'étais déjà 3 ou 5 ans encore au delà, ce qui a un peu compliqué les choses. Mais il m'encourageait et ne me jugeait pas, et je m'en souviendrai toujours.

Artie Mogull at Witmark Music signed me next to his company, and he told me to just keep writing songs no matter what, that I might be on to something. Well, he too stood behind me, and he could never wait to see what I'd give him next. I didn't even think of myself as a songwriter before then. I'll always be grateful for him also for that attitude.
Artie Mogull de Witmark Music me signa ensuite dans sa société d'édition, et il me dit de continuer à écrire mes chansons quoi qu'il arrive, que je devais avoir quelque chose. Lui aussi était avec moi et il ne pouvait jamais attendre ce que je pourrais lui amener ensuite. Je ne me voyais même pas comme un auteur-compositeur avant ça. Je lui serai toujours reconnaissant de cette attitude.

I also have to mention some of the early artists who recorded my songs very, very early, without having to be asked. Just something they felt about them that was right for them. I've got to say thank you to Peter, Paul and Mary, who I knew all separately before they ever became a group. I didn't even think of myself as writing songs for others to sing but it was starting to happen and it couldn't have happened to, or with, a better group.
Je dois aussi citer quelques uns des artistes qui enregistrèrent mes chansons très très tôt, sans que persone ne leur demande. Juste parce qu'ils sentaient que quelque chose leur allait bien. Il me faut remercier Peter, Paul And Mary, que je connaissais chacun séparément avant qu'ils deviennent un groupe. Je n'avais jamais pensé à écrire des chansons pour les autres mais cela a commencé à arriver et cela n'aurait pas pu arriver avec un meilleur groupe.

They took a song of mine that had been recorded before that was buried on one of my records and turned it into a hit song. Not the way I would have done it -- they straightened it out. But since then hundreds of people have recorded it and I don't think that would have happened if it wasn't for them. They definitely started something for me.
Ils ont pris une de mes chansons, déjà enregistrée et enterrée au fond d'un de mes disques, et en on fait un tube. Pas de la façon dont je l'aurais fait (ils l'ont rendue carrée). Mais depuis, des centaines de personnes l'ont enregistrée et je ne pense pas que cela serait arrivé sans eux. Ils ont vraiment lancé la machine pour moi.

The Byrds, the Turtles, Sonny & Cher -- they made some of my songs Top 10 hits but I wasn't a pop songwriter and I really didn't want to be that, but it was good that it happened. Their versions of songs were like commercials, but I didn't really mind that because 50 years later my songs were being used in the commercials. So that was good too. I was glad it happened, and I was glad they'd done it.
Les Byrds, les Turtles, Sonny & Cher, ils ont fait de mes chansons des tubes du Top 10 mais je n'étais pas un chanteur compositeur pop et je ne voulais pas le devenir, mais c'est bien que ça soit arrivé. Leurs versions des chansons étaient comme des pubs, mais je m'en fichais un peu puisque 50 ans plus tard mes chansons seraient utilisées dans des pubs. Et donc c'eétait bien, aussi. J'étais content que cela arrive et j'étais content qu'ils l'aient fait.

Pervis Staples and the Staple Singers -- long before they were on Stax they were on Epic and they were one of my favorite groups of all time. I met them all in '62 or '63. They heard my songs live and Pervis wanted to record three or four of them and he did with the Staples Singers. They were the type of artists that I wanted recording my songs.
Pervis Staples et les Staple Singers (longtemps avant qu'ils soient chez Stax, ils étaient chez Epic et c'était un de mes groupes préférés de toujours). Je les ai rencontrés en 1962 ou 1963. Ils avaient entendu mes chansons en concert et Pervis voulait en enregistrer 3 ou 4 et il le fit avec les Staple Singers. Ils étaient exactement le genre d'artistes que je voulais entendre enregistrer mes chansons.

Nina Simone. I used to cross paths with her in New York City in the Village Gate nightclub. These were the artists I looked up to. She recorded some of my songs that she [inaudible] to me. She was an overwhelming artist, piano player and singer. Very strong woman, very outspoken. That she was recording my songs validated everything that I was about.
Nina Simone, je l'ai croisée à New York, dans la boite de nuit Village Gate. Elle faisait partie des artistes que j'admirais. Elle a enregistré quelques unes de mes chansons, qu'elle m'a [inaudible]. C'était une artiste irrésistible, pianiste et chanteuse. Une femme très forte, très directe. Le fait qu'elle enregistre mes chansons a justifié pour moi tout ce que je faisais.

Oh, and can't forget Jimi Hendrix. I actually saw Jimi Hendrix perform when he was in a band called Jimmy James and the Blue Flames -- something like that. And Jimi didn't even sing. He was just the guitar player. He took some small songs of mine that nobody paid any attention to and pumped them up into the outer limits of the stratosphere and turned them all into classics. I have to thank Jimi, too. I wish he was here.
Oh et je je peux pas oublier Jimi Hendrix. En fait, j'ai vu Jimi Hendrix jouer quand il était dans un groupe nommé Jimmy James And The Blue Flames (quelque chose comme ça). Et Jimi ne chantait même pas. Il était juste le guitariste. Il a pris quelques unes de mes petites chansons que personne n'avait pas remarquées et les a glonflées et envoyées au delà des limites de la stratosphère et en a fait des classiques. Je dois remercier Jimi aussi. J'aimerais qu'il soit encore parmi nous.

Johnny Cash recorded some of my songs early on, too, up in about '63, when he was all skin and bones. He traveled long, he traveled hard, but he was a hero of mine. I heard many of his songs growing up. I knew them better than I knew my own. "Big River," "I Walk the Line."
Johnny Cash a aussi enregistré très tôt quelques unes de mes chansons, vers 1963, quand il était maigre comme un clou. Il a fait un long et dur voyage, mais c'était un de mes héros. J'ai écouté beaucoup de ses chansons quand j'étais enfant et en grandissant. Je les connaissais mieux que les miennes. "Big River," "I Walk the Line."

"How high's the water, Mama?" I wrote "It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" with that song reverberating inside my head. I still ask, "How high is the water, mama?" Johnny was an intense character. And he saw that people were putting me down playing electric music, and he posted letters to magazines scolding people, telling them to shut up and let him sing.
"How high's the water, Mama?"  J'ai écris "It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" avec cette chanson en tête. Je demande encore "Jusquà quel point l'eau est haute, Maman ?" Johnny était un sacré personnage. Et quand il a vu que les gens me descendaient parce que j'électrifiais ma musique, il a écrit des lettres aux magazines pour les engueuler, leur dire de la fermer et de me laisser chanter.

In Johnny Cash's world -- hardcore Southern drama -- that kind of thing didn't exist. Nobody told anybody what to sing or what not to sing. They just didn't do that kind of thing. I'm always going to thank him for that. Johnny Cash was a giant of a man, the man in black. And I'll always cherish the friendship we had until the day there is no more days.
Dans le monde de Johnny Cash (le théatre du Sud profond) ce genre de choses n'existe pas. Personne ne dit à quelqu'un quoi chanter et ne pas chanter. Ils ne font pas ce genre de choses. Je le remercierai toujours pour ça. Johnny Cash était un géant, le Man in black. Et je chérirai jusqu'à la fin le souvenir de son amitié.

Oh, and I'd be remiss if I didn't mention Joan Baez. She was the queen of folk music then and now. She took a liking to my songs and brought me with her to play concerts, where she had crowds of thousands of people enthralled with her beauty and voice.
Oh et je serais négligent de ne pas citer Joan Baez. Elle était la reine de la musique folk et elle l'est encore. Elle s'est prise d'affection pour mes chansons et m'a emmené pour jouer à ses concerts alors qu'elle enchantait des foules de milliers de personnes avec la beauté de sa voix.

People would say, "What are you doing with that ragtag scrubby little waif?" And she'd tell everybody in no uncertain terms, "Now you better be quiet and listen to the songs." We even played a few of them together. Joan Baez is as tough-minded as they come. Love. And she's a free, independent spirit. Nobody can tell her what to do if she doesn't want to do it. I learned a lot of things from her. A woman with devastating honesty. And for her kind of love and devotion, I could never pay that back.
Les gens lui disaient : "Mais qu'est-ce que tu fais avec ce petit délaissé rabougri et mal fagoté ?" Et elle leur répondait à tous avec assurance : "Maintenant, vous feriez mieux de vous calmer et d'écouter ses chansons". On en a même joué quelques unes ensembles. Joan Baez est aussi ferme qu'on peut l'être. Amour. Et c'est une esprit lible, indépendant. Personne ne peut lui dire ce qu'elle doit faire si elle n'en na pas envie. J'ai beaucoup appris d'elle. Une femme avec une honnêteté bouleversante. Et je ne saurai jamais lui rendre tout son amour et son dévouement.

These songs didn't come out of thin air. I didn't just make them up out of whole cloth. Contrary to what Lou Levy said, there was a precedent. It all came out of traditional music: traditional folk music, traditional rock 'n' roll and traditional big-band swing orchestra music.
Ces chansons ne sont pas apparues par magie. Je ne les ai pas sorties de nulle part. Contrairement à ce que Lou Levy avait dit, il y avait un précédent. Tout venait des musiques traditionnelles : musique folk traditionnelles, classiques du rock'n'roll et de l'ère des grands orchestres swing.

I learned lyrics and how to write them from listening to folk songs. And I played them, and I met other people that played them back when nobody was doing it. Sang nothing but these folk songs, and they gave me the code for everything that's fair game, that everything belongs to everyone.
J'ai appris les paroles et la façon de les écrires en écoutant des chansons folk. Et j'en jouais, et je rencontrais des gens qui en jouaient à l'époque où personne ne faisait encore ça. Je ne chantais que ces chansons folk, et elle m'ont donné la clé de tout, et que tout appartient à tous.

For three or four years all I listened to were folk standards. I went to sleep singing folk songs. I sang them everywhere, clubs, parties, bars, coffeehouses, fields, festivals. And I met other singers along the way who did the same thing and we just learned songs from each other. I could learn one song and sing it next in an hour if I'd heard it just once.
Durant 3 ou 4 ans, je n'ai écouté que des classiques folk. J'allais au lit en chantant des chansons folk. Je les chantais partout : boites, fêtes, bars, cafés, dans la rue, les festivals. Et j'ai rencontré d'autres chanteurs qui faisaient pareil et nous nous sommes mutuellement appris des chanons. Je pouvais apprendre une chansons et la re-chanter dans l'heure en ne l'ayant écoutée qu'une seule fois.

If you sang "John Henry" as many times as me -- "John Henry was a steel-driving man / Died with a hammer in his hand / John Henry said a man ain't nothin' but a man / Before I let that steam drill drive me down / I'll die with that hammer in my hand."
Si vous chantiez "John Henry" autant de fois que je l'ai chantée ("John Henry was a steel-driving man / Died with a hammer in his hand / John Henry said a man ain't nothin' but a man / Before I let that steam drill drive me down / I'll die with that hammer in my hand.")

If you had sung that song as many times as I did, you'd have written "How many roads must a man walk down?" too.
Si vous aviez chanté cette chanson autant de fois que je l'ai chantée, vous auriez aussi écrit "How many roads must a man walk down?".

Big Bill Broonzy had a song called "Key to the Highway." "I've got a key to the highway / I'm booked and I'm bound to go / Gonna leave here runnin' because walking is most too slow." I sang that a lot. If you sing that a lot, you just might write,
Big Bill Broonzy avait une chanson appelée "Key to the Highway." "I've got a key to the highway / I'm booked and I'm bound to go / Gonna leave here runnin' because walking is most too slow."
Si vous chantez beaucoup cela, vous pourriez écrire :

Georgia Sam he had a bloody nose
Welfare Department they wouldn’t give him no clothes
He asked poor Howard where can I go
Howard said there’s only one place I know
Sam said tell me quick man I got to run
Howard just pointed with his gun
And said that way down on Highway 61

You'd have written that too if you'd sang "Key to the Highway" as much as me.
Vous aussi vous auriez écrit cela si vous aviez chanté "Key to the Highway" autant que moi.

"Ain't no use sit 'n cry / You'll be an angel by and by / Sail away, ladies, sail away." "I'm sailing away my own true love." "Boots of Spanish Leather" -- Sheryl Crow just sung that.
"Ain't no use sit 'n cry / You'll be an angel by and by / Sail away, ladies, sail away." "I'm sailing away my own true love." "Boots of Spanish Leather" : Sheryl Crow a chanté ça.

"Roll the cotton down, aw, yeah, roll the cotton down / Ten dollars a day is a white man's pay / A dollar a day is the black man's pay / Roll the cotton down." If you sang that song as many times as me, you'd be writing "I ain't gonna work on Maggie's farm no more," too.
"Roll the cotton down, aw, yeah, roll the cotton down / Ten dollars a day is a white man's pay / A dollar a day is the black man's pay / Roll the cotton down." Si vous aviez chanté cette chansons autant de fois que moi, vous écririez "I ain't gonna work on Maggie's farm no more," vous aussi.

I sang a lot of "come all you" songs. There's plenty of them. There's way too many to be counted. "Come along boys and listen to my tale / Tell you of my trouble on the old Chisholm Trail." Or, "Come all ye good people, listen while I tell / the fate of Floyd Collins a lad we all know well / The fate of Floyd Collins, a lad we all know well."
J'ai chanté beaucoup de chansons qui commencent par "Venez par ici". Il y en a plein. Il y en a trop pour les compter. "Come along boys and listen to my tale / Tell you of my trouble on the old Chisholm Trail." Ou "Come all ye good people, listen while I tell / the fate of Floyd Collins a lad we all know well / The fate of Floyd Collins, a lad we all know well."

"Come all ye fair and tender ladies / Take warning how you court your men / They're like a star on a summer morning / They first appear and then they're gone again." "If you'll gather 'round, people / A story I will tell / 'Bout Pretty Boy Floyd, an outlaw / Oklahoma knew him well."

If you sung all these "come all ye" songs all the time, you'd be writing, "Come gather 'round people where ever you roam, admit that the waters around you have grown / Accept that soon you'll be drenched to the bone / If your time to you is worth saving / And you better start swimming or you'll sink like a stone / The times they are a-changing."
Si vous chantiez toutes ces "Venez par ici" tout le temps, vous écririez "Come gather 'round people where ever you roam, admit that the waters around you have grown / Accept that soon you'll be drenched to the bone / If your time to you is worth saving / And you better start swimming or you'll sink like a stone / The times they are a-changing."

You'd have written them too. There's nothing secret about it. You just do it subliminally and unconsciously, because that's all enough, and that's all I sang. That was all that was dear to me. They were the only kinds of songs that made sense.
Vous les auriez écrites vous aussi. Il n'y a rien de secret là dedans. Vous le feriez de façon subliminale et inconsciente, parce que c'est tout ce qu'il faut et c'est tout ce que je chantais. C'est tout ce qui m'étais cher. C'était les seules chansons qui avaient un sens.

"When you go down to Deep Ellum keep your money in your socks / Women in Deep Ellum put you on the rocks." Sing that song for a while and you just might come up with, "When you're lost in the rain in Juarez and it's Easter time too / And your gravity fails and negativity don't pull you through / Don’t put on any airs / When you’re down on Rue Morgue Avenue / They got some hungry women there / And they really make a mess outta you."
"When you go down to Deep Ellum keep your money in your socks / Women in Deep Ellum put you on the rocks." Chantez cette chanson pendant un moment, et vous finirez en chantant "When you're lost in the rain in Juarez and it's Easter time too / And your gravity fails and negativity don't pull you through / Don’t put on any airs / When you’re down on Rue Morgue Avenue / They got some hungry women there / And they really make a mess outta you."

All these songs are connected. Don't be fooled. I just opened up a different door in a different kind of way. It's just different, saying the same thing. I didn't think it was anything out of the ordinary.
Toutes ces chansons sont reliées entre elles. Ne vous laissez pas abuser. J'ai juste ouvert une autre porte d'une autre façon. C'est juste différent tout en disant la même chose. Je ne pensais pas faire autre chose que du très ordinaire.

Well you know, I just thought I was doing something natural, but right from the start, my songs were divisive for some reason. They divided people. I never knew why. Some got angered, others loved them. Didn't know why my songs had detractors and supporters. A strange environment to have to throw your songs into, but I did it anyway.
Bon, vous savez, je pensais juste faire quelque chose de naturel, mais dès le début, mes chansons étaient clivantes pour certaines raisons. Elle divisaient les gens. Je n'ai jamais su pourquoi. Certains se fachaient, d'autres les aimaient. Je ne savais pas pourquoi mes chansons avait leurs détracteurs et leurs supporteurs. Un drôle de climat pour y jeter vos chansons, mais je le faisait quoiqu'il arrive.

Last thing I thought of was who cared about what song I was writing. I was just writing them. I didn't think I was doing anything different. I thought I was just extending the line. Maybe a little bit unruly, but I was just elaborating on situations. Maybe hard to pin down, but so what? A lot of people are hard to pin down. You've just got to bear it. I didn't really care what Lieber and Stoller thought of my songs.
La dernière chose à laquelle je pensais était de savoir qui faisait attention à quel genre de chansons j'écrivais. Je les écrivais juste. Je ne pensais pas faire quoi que ce soit de différent. Je pensais que je ne faisais qu'étirer un peu les vers. Peut être un peu en dehors des règles, mais je ne faisais que développer à partir de situations. Peut-être un peu dur à cerner, mais quoi ? Beaucoup de gens sont difficiles à cerner. Il faut juste s'y faire. Je ne me souciais pas vraiment de ce que Leiber et Stoller puvaient penser de mes chansons.

They didn't like 'em, but Doc Pomus did. That was all right that they didn't like 'em, because I never liked their songs either. "Yakety yak, don't talk back." "Charlie Brown is a clown," "Baby I'm a hog for you." Novelty songs. They weren't saying anything serious. Doc's songs, they were better. "This Magic Moment." "Lonely Avenue." Save the Last Dance for Me.
Ils ne les aimaient pas, mais Doc Pomus les aimait. Ça m'allait bien qu'ils n'aiment pas mes chansons, parce que je n'avais jamais aimé les leurs non plus. "Yakety yak, don't talk back." "Charlie Brown is a clown," "Baby I'm a hog for you." Des babioles. Elles ne disaient rien de sérieux. Les chansons de Doc étaient mieux : "This Magic Moment." "Lonely Avenue." Save the Last Dance for Me".

Those songs broke my heart. I figured I'd rather have his blessings any day than theirs.
Ces chansons me brisaient le coeur. Je me disais que je préférais avoir sa bénédiction plutôt que la leur.

Ahmet Ertegun didn't think much of my songs, but Sam Phillips did. Ahmet founded Atlantic Records. He produced some great records: Ray Charles, Ray Brown, just to name a few.
Ahmet Ertegun ne pensait pas grand chose de mes chansons, mais Sam Phillips oui. Ahmet a fondé Atlantic Records. Il a produit des disques géniaux : Ray Charles, Ray Brown, pour ne citer qu'eux.

There were some great records in there, no question about it. But Sam Phillips, he recorded Elvis and Jerry Lee, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash. Radical eyes that shook the very essence of humanity. Revolution in style and scope. Heavy shape and color. Radical to the bone. Songs that cut you to the bone. Renegades in all degrees, doing songs that would never decay, and still resound to this day. Oh, yeah, I'd rather have Sam Phillips' blessing any day.
Il y avait des disques géniaux là dedans, ça ne fait aucun doute. Mais Sam Phillips, il a enregistré Elvis et Jerry Lee, Carl Perkins et Johnny Cash. Des visions radicales qui ont secoué l'essence même de l'humanité. Une révolution dans le style et les sujets abordés. Des formes et des couleurs profondes. Radicaux jusqu'à l'os. Des chansons qui vous touchaient jusqu'à l'os. Rebelles dans tous les sens du terme, faisant des chansons qui ne faibliront jamais et qui résonnent encore aujourd'hui.  Oh oui, je préfère la bénédiction de Sam Phillips à toute autre.

Merle Haggard didn't even think much of my songs. I know he didn't. He didn't say that to me, but I know [inaudible]. Buck Owens did, and he recorded some of my early songs. Merle Haggard -- "Mama Tried," "The Bottle Let Me Down," "I'm a Lonesome Fugitive." I can't imagine Waylon Jennings singing "The Bottle Let Me Down."
Merle Haggard ne pensait même pas à mes chansons. Je le sais. Il ne m'en a rien dit, mais je sais [inaudible]. Buck Owens, lui il en pensait du bien et il a enregistré quelques une de mes premières chansons.  Merle Haggard : "Mama Tried," "The Bottle Let Me Down," "I'm a Lonesome Fugitive." Je n'imagine pas Waylon Jennings chanter "The Bottle Let Me Down."

"Together Again"? That's Buck Owens, and that trumps anything coming out of Bakersfield. Buck Owens and Merle Haggard? If you have to have somebody's blessing -- you figure it out.
"Together Again"? Ça, c'est Buck Owens, et ça surclasse tout ce qui est jamais sorti de Bakersfield. Buck Owens et Merle Haggard ? Si vous devez avoir la bénédiction de quelqu'un... Vous voyez ce que je veux dire.

Oh, yeah. Critics have been giving me a hard time since Day One. Critics say I can't sing. I croak. Sound like a frog. Why don't critics say that same thing about Tom Waits? Critics say my voice is shot. That I have no voice. What don't they say those things about Leonard Cohen? Why do I get special treatment? Critics say I can't carry a tune and I talk my way through a song. Really? I've never heard that said about Lou Reed. Why does he get to go scot-free?
Ah oui. Les critiques ont été durs avec moi, dès le premier jour. Les critiques disent que je ne sais pas chanter. Ça sonne comme un crapaud. Pourquoi les critiques ne disent pas la même chose de Tom Waits ? Les critiques disent que ma voix est détruite. Que je n'ai pas de voix. Pourquoi ne disent-ils pas cela à propos de Leonard Cohen. Les critiques disent que je ne sais pas porter une mélodie et que je parle au lieu de chanter mes chansons. Vraiment ? Je n'i jamais entendu dire ça de Lou Reed. Comment il a fait pour s'en sortir comme ça ?

What have I done to deserve this special attention? No vocal range? When's the last time you heard Dr. John? Why don't you say that about him? Slur my words, got no diction. Have you people ever listened to Charley Patton or Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters. Talk about slurred words and no diction. [Inaudible] doesn't even matter.
Qu'ai-je fait pour mériter de telles attentions. Pas d'étendue vocale ? Quand avez-vous écouté Dr. John pour la dernière fois ? Pourquoi vous ne dites pas cela à son propos ? Je marmonne, je n'articule pas. Est-ce que vous avez jamais écouté Charley Patton ou Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters. Parlez-moi de marmonner et de ne pas particuler. [Inaudible] ça ne fait rien.

"Why me, Lord?" I would say that to myself.
"Pourquoi moi, Seigneur ?" je me demande.

Critics say I mangle my melodies, render my songs unrecognizable. Oh, really? Let me tell you something. I was at a boxing match a few years ago seeing Floyd Mayweather fight a Puerto Rican guy. And the Puerto Rican national anthem, somebody sang it and it was beautiful. It was heartfelt and it was moving.
Les critiques disent que je massacre mes mélodies, rendant mes chansons méconnaissables. Ah, vraiment ? Laissez-moi vous dire. Je suis allé voir un match de boxe il y a quelques années, voir Floyd Mayweather combattre un Portoricain. Et l'hymne portoricain, quelqu'un l'a chanté et c'était beau. C'était sincère et émouvant.

After that it was time for our national anthem. And a very popular soul-singing sister was chosen to sing. She sang every note -- that exists, and some that don't exist. Talk about mangling a melody. You take a one-syllable word and make it last for 15 minutes? She was doing vocal gymnastics like she was on a trapeze act. But to me it was not funny.
Et ce fut le tour de notre hymne national. Et une soul sister rtès populaire avait été choisie pour le chanter. Elle a chanté toutes les notes, celles qui existent et d'autres qui n'existent pas. Parlez-moi de massacrer une mélodie. Vous prenez un mot d'une syllabe et vous le faites durer 15 minutes ? Elle faisait de la gymnastique vocale, comme un tour de trapèze. Mais je n'ai pas trouvé ça drôle.

Where were the critics? Mangling lyrics? Mangling a melody? Mangling a treasured song? No, I get the blame. But I don't really think I do that. I just think critics say I do.
Où étaient les critiques ? Mélanger les paroles ? Déstructurer la mélodie ? Massacrer un chef d'oeuvre ? Non, c'est moi qu'on vilipende. Mais je ne pense pas que je le fasse vraiment. Je pense que ce sont juste les critiques qui disent que je le fais.
 
Sam Cooke said this when told he had a beautiful voice: He said, "Well that's very kind of you, but voices ought not to be measured by how pretty they are. Instead they matter only if they convince you that they are telling the truth." Think about that the next time you [inaudible].
Sam Cooke a répondu à quelqu'un qui lui disait qu'il avait une belle voix : "Et bien c'est gentil de votre part, il ne fait pas juger une voix sur sa beauté. Ce qui compte plutôt, c'est si elle vous convainc qu'elle dit la vérité." Pensez-y la prochaine fois que vous [inaudible].

Times always change. They really do. And you have to always be ready for something that's coming along and you never expected it. Way back when, I was in Nashville making some records and I read this article, a Tom T. Hall interview. Tom T. Hall, he was bitching about some kind of new song, and he couldn't understand what these new kinds of songs that were coming in were about.
Les temps changent en permanence. Vraiment.  Et il faut être toujours prêt à ce qu'il arrive quelque chose à quoi vous ne vous attendiez pas du tout. Il y a longtemps, je faisais un disque à Nashville et j'ai lu un article, une interview de Tom T. Hall. Il se moquait d'un genre de nouvelles chansons et il ne comprenait pas de quoi parlaient ces nouvelles chansons.

Now Tom, he was one of the most preeminent songwriters of the time in Nashville. A lot of people were recording his songs and he himself even did it. But he was all in a fuss about James Taylor, a song James had called "Country Road." Tom was going off in this interview -- "But James don't say nothing about a country road. He's just says how you can feel it on the country road. I don't understand that."
Tom T. Hall était l'un des auteurs-compositeurs les plus en vue de Nashville à cette époque. Beaucoup de gens enregistraient ses chansons et iul en enregistrait aussi lui-même. Mais il faisait tout un foin à propos de James Taylor, d'une chanson que James avait appelée "Counrtry Road". Tom sortait dans cette interview : "Mais James ne raconte rien d'une route de campagne. Il raconte juste ce qu'on peut ressentir sur une route de campagne. Je ne comprends pas cela."

Now some might say Tom is a great songwriter. I'm not going to doubt that. At the time he was doing this interview I was actually listening to a song of his on the radio.
Bon, vous pourrez me dire que Tom est un grand auteur-compositeur. Je ne vais pas le remettre en question. Au moment où je lisais cette interview, j'écoutais justement une de ses chansons à la radio.

It was called "I Love." I was listening to it in a recording studio, and he was talking about all the things he loves, an everyman kind of song, trying to connect with people. Trying to make you think that he's just like you and you're just like him. We all love the same things, and we're all in this together. Tom loves little baby ducks, slow-moving trains and rain. He loves old pickup trucks and little country streams. Sleeping without dreams. Bourbon in a glass. Coffee in a cup. Tomatoes on the vine, and onions.
Elle s'appelait "J'aime". Je l'écoutai dans le studio, et il parlait de toutes les choses qu'il aimait, le genre de chanson adressée à tous, essayant de parler à tous. Qui essaie de vous faire penser qu'il est tout comme vous et que vous êtes tout comme lui. Nous aimons tous les mêmes choses et nous sommes tous ensembles d'accord. Tom aime les petits bébés canards, les trains qui roulent lentement et la pluie. Il aime les vieux camions et le courant des petits ruisseaux. Dormir sans rêver. Un bourbon dans un verre. Un café dans une tasse. Les plants de tomates et les oignons.

Now listen, I'm not ever going to disparage another songwriter. I'm not going to do that. I'm not saying it's a bad song. I'm just saying it might be a little overcooked. But, you know, it was in the top 10 anyway. Tom and a few other writers had the whole Nashville scene sewed up in a box. If you wanted to record a song and get it in the top 10 you had to go to them, and Tom was one of the top guys. They were all very comfortable, doing their thing.
Ecoutez, je ne vais pas dénigrer un autre auteur-compositeur. Je ne vais pas le faire. Je ne dis pas que c'est ue mauvaise chanson, je dis juste qu'elle est peut-être un peu recuite. Mais vous savez, elle était quand même dans le Top 10. Tom et quelques autres avaient mis en coupe réglée toute la scène de Nashville. Si vous vouliez enregistrer un Top 10, il fallait en passer par eux, et Tom était l'un d'entre eux. Ils vivaient tous dans leur petit confort, faisant leur truc àeux.

This was about the time that Willie Nelson picked up and moved to Texas. About the same time. He's still in Texas. Everything was very copacetic. Everything was all right until -- until -- Kristofferson came to town. Oh, they ain't seen anybody like him. He came into town like a wildcat, flew his helicopter into Johnny Cash's backyard like a typical songwriter. And he went for the throat. "Sunday Morning Coming Down."
C'est à peu près à cette époque que Willie Nelson est parti vivre au Texas. Quasi au même moment. Il est encore au Texas.  Tout était complètement parfait. Tout allait bien jusqu'à ce que, jusqu'à ce que que Kristofferson arive en ville. Oh, ils n'avaient jamais vu quelqu'un comme lui. Il est arrivé en ville comme un chat sauvage, a ateri avec son hélicoptère dans la cour de Johnny Cash comme n'importe quel auteur-compositeur. Et il a donné de la voix. "Sunday Morning Coming Down."

Well, I woke up Sunday morning
With no way to hold my head that didn't hurt.
And the beer I had for breakfast wasn't bad
So I had one more for dessert
Then I fumbled through my closet
Found my cleanest dirty shirt
Then I washed my face and combed my hair
And stumbled down the stairs to meet the day.

You can look at Nashville pre-Kris and post-Kris, because he changed everything. That one song ruined Tom T. Hall's poker parties. It might have sent him to the crazy house. God forbid he ever heard any of my songs.
Vous pouvez comparer Nashvile avant et après Kris, parce qu'il y a tout changé. Cette seule chanson a ruiné la main de Tom T. Hall. Elle aurait pu le mener à l'asile. Dieu soit loué qu'il n'ait jamais entendu aucune de mes chansons.

You walk into the room
With your pencil in your hand
You see somebody naked
You say, “Who is that man?”
You try so hard
But you don’t understand
Just what you're gonna say
When you get home
You know something is happening here
But you don’t know what it is
Do you, Mister Jones?

If "Sunday Morning Coming Down" rattled Tom's cage, sent him into the looney bin, my song surely would have made him blow his brains out, right there in the minivan. Hopefully he didn't hear it.
Si "Sunday Morning Coming Down" a secoué la cage de Tom, l'a envoyé au cabanon, avec mes chansons il se serait sûrement fait sauter le caisson dans son minibus. Heureusement, il n'a jamais entendu ça.

I just released an album of standards, all the songs usually done by Michael Buble, Harry Connick Jr., maybe Brian Wilson's done a couple, Linda Ronstadt done 'em. But the reviews of their records are different than the reviews of my record.
Je viens de sortir un album de classiques, toutes ces chansons habituellement chantées par Michael Buble, Harry Connick Jr., peut-être Brian Wilson en a-t-il fait une dou deux, Linda Ronstadt les a chantées aussi. Mais les critiques de leurs disques sont différentes de celles du mien.

In their reviews no one says anything. In my reviews, [inaudible] they've got to look under every stone when it comes to me. They've got to mention all the songwriters' names. Well that's OK with me. After all, they're great songwriters and these are standards. I've seen the reviews come in, and they'll mention all the songwriters in half the review, as if everybody knows them. Nobody's heard of them, not in this time, anyway. Buddy Kaye, Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh, to name a few.
Dans leurs critiques, personnes ne dit rien. Dans les miennes, [inaudible] il faut qu'ils aillent tout fouiller en détail puisque qu'il s'agit de moi. Il faut qu'ils mentionnent les noms de tous les compositeurs. Bon, ça me va. Après tout, ce sont de grands auteurs et ces chansons sont des classiques. J'ai vu les critiques arriver, et ils listent tous les compositeurs sur la moitié de la critique, comme si tout le monde les connaissait. Maius personne n'a jamais entendu parler d'eux, pas à notre époque en tous cas. Buddy Kaye, Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh, pour ne citer qu'eux.

But, you know, I'm glad they mention their names, and you know what? I'm glad they got their names in the press. It might have taken some time to do it, but they're finally there. I can only wonder why it took so long. My only regret is that they're not here to see it.
Mais vous savez, je suis content de citer meurs noms, et vous savez quoi ? Je suis content que leurs noms soient dans la presse. Ça a pris du temps, mais finalement ils y sont. Je peux me demander pouquoi il a fallu tant de temps. Mon seul regret est qu'ils ne soient plus là pour voir ça.

Traditional rock 'n' roll, we're talking about that. It's all about rhythm. Johnny Cash said it best: "Get rhythm. Get rhythm when you get the blues." Very few rock 'n' roll bands today play with rhythm. They don't know what it is. Rock 'n' roll is a combination of blues, and it's a strange thing made up of two parts. A lot of people don't know this, but the blues, which is an American music, is not what you think it is. It's a combination of Arabic violins and Strauss waltzes working it out. But it's true.
Le rock'n'roll classique, c'est ce dont on parle. Tout est dans le rythme. Johnny Cash l'a dit mieux que tous : "Mettez-y du rythme. Du rythme, quand vous avez le blues." Très peu de groupe de rock d'aujourd'hui jouent avec autant de rythme. Ils ne savent pas ce que c'est. Le rock'n'roll est un mélange de blues, et c'est une chose étrange faite de deux composantes. Beaucoup de gens ne savent paque le blues, qui est une musique américaine, n'est pas ce qu'on croit. C'est un mélange de violons arabes et de valses de Strauss pour embaler le tout. Mais c'est vrai.

The other half of rock 'n' roll has got to be hillbilly. And that's a derogatory term, but it ought not to be. That's a term that includes the Delmore Bros., Stanley Bros., Roscoe Holcomb, Clarence Ashley ... groups like that. Moonshiners gone berserk. Fast cars on dirt roads. That's the kind of combination that makes up rock 'n' roll, and it can't be cooked up in a science laboratory or a studio.
L'autre moitié du rock'n'roll est la musique hillbilly. Et c'est un terme péjoratif, mais cela ne devrait pas. C'est un terme qui englobe les Delmore Bros., Stanley Bros., Roscoe Holcomb, Clarence Ashley, des groupes de ce genre. Des bouilleurs de cru clandestins devenus mabouls. Des voitures rapides sur des routes poussiéreuses. C'est ce genre de mélange qui fait le rock'n'roll, et on ne peut pas le reproduire dans un laboratoire ou un studio.

You have to have the right kind of rhythm to play this kind of music. If you can't hardly play the blues, how do you [inaudible] those other two kinds of music in there? You can fake it, but you can't really do it.
Il faut avoir le bon sens du rythme puor jouer ce genre de musique. Si vous savez à peine jouer du blues, comment pouvez-vous [inaudible] les deux sortes de musiques qu'on y trouve ? Vous pouvez simuler mais vous ne pouvez pas vraiment la jouer.

Critics have made a career out of accusing me of having a career of confounding expectations. Really? Because that's all I do. That's how I think about it. Confounding expectations.
Des critiques ont fait carrière en m'accusant d'avoir fait carière en décevant les attentes. Vraiment ? Parce que c'est exactement ce que je fais. C'est comme ça que je raisonne. Décevoir les attentes.

"What do you do for a living, man?"
"De quoi tu vis, mec ?"

"Oh, I confound expectations."
"Oh, je déçois les attentes."

You're going to get a job, the man says, "What do you do?" "Oh, confound expectations.: And the man says, "Well, we already have that spot filled. Call us back. Or don't call us, we'll call you." Confounding expectations. What does that mean? 'Why me, Lord? I'd confound them, but I don't know how to do it.'
Tu viens pour un boulot, on te demande : "Qu'est-ce que tu sais faire ?" ; "Oh, décevoir les attentes". Et on te répond : "Bien, mais le poste est déjà pourvu. Rappelez-nous. Ou plutôt, ne nous rappelez pas, nous vous rappellerons." Décevoir les attentes. Qu'est-ce que ça veut dire ? "Pourquoi moi, Seigneur ? Je les déçois, mais je ne sais pas comment il faut faire pour ça."

The Blackwood Bros. have been talking to me about making a record together. That might confound expectations, but it shouldn't. Of course it would be a gospel album. I don't think it would be anything out of the ordinary for me. Not a bit. One of the songs I'm thinking about singing is "Stand By Me" by the Blackwood Brothers. Not "Stand By Me" the pop song. No. The real "Stand By Me."
Les Blackwood Bros. m'ont contacté pour faire un disque ensembles. Qui pourrait décevoir les attentes, mais qui ne devrait pas. Bien sûr, il s'agit d'un album de gospel. Je ne pense pas qu'il s'agirait de quelque chose en dehors de l'ordinaire, pour moi. Pas du tout. Une des chansons auxquelles je pense est le "Stand By Me" des Blackwood Brothers. Pas "Stand By Me" la chanson pop. La vraie "Stand By Me".

The real one goes like this:
La vraie commence comme ça :

When the storm of life is raging / Stand by me / When the storm of life is raging / Stand by me / When the world is tossing me / Like a ship upon the sea / Thou who rulest wind and water / Stand by me

In the midst of tribulation / Stand by me / In the midst of tribulation / Stand by me / When the hosts of hell assail / And my strength begins to fail / Thou who never lost a battle / Stand by me

In the midst of faults and failures / Stand by me / In the midst of faults and failures / Stand by me / When I do the best I can / And my friends don't understand / Thou who knowest all about me / Stand by me

That's the song. I like it better than the pop song. If I record one by that name, that's going to be the one. I'm also thinking of recording a song, not on that album, though: "Oh Lord, Please Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood."
Voilà la chanson. Je la préfère à la chanson pop. Si j'en enregistre une de ce nom, ce sera celle-là. Je pense aussi enregistrer une autre chanson, mais pas sur cet album : ""Oh Lord, Please Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood." (Oh Seigneur, fais que je ne sois pas incompris).

Anyway, why me, Lord. What did I do?
Et en plus, pourquoi moi, Seigneur. Qu'est que j'ai fais pour mériter ça ?

Anyway, I'm proud to be here tonight for MusiCares. I'm honored to have all these artists singing my songs. There's nothing like that. Great artists. [applause, inaudible]. They're all singing the truth, and you can hear it in their voices.
Quoi qu'il en soit, je suis fier d'être ici ce soir pour MusiCares. Je suis honoré d'entendre tous ces artistes chanter mes chansons. Il n'y a rien de tel. De grands artistes. [applaudissements, inaudible]. Ils chantent tous la vérité, et cela s'entend dans leurs voix.

I'm proud to be here tonight for MusiCares. I think a lot of this organization. They've helped many people. Many musicians who have contributed a lot to our culture. I'd like to personally thank them for what they did for a friend of mine, Billy Lee Riley. A friend of mine who they helped for six years when he was down and couldn't work. Billy was a son of rock 'n' roll, obviously.
Je suis fier d'être ici pour MusiCares. je pense beaucoup à cette organisation. Ils ont aidé beaucoup de gens. Beaucoup de musiciens qui ont tant contribué à notre culture. J'aimerais les remercier personnellement pour ce qu'ils ont fait pour un ami à moi, Billy Lee Riley. Un ami qu'ils ont aidé durant six années où il était au plus bas et ne pouvait pas travailler. Billy était assurément un enfant du rock'n'roll.

He was a true original. He did it all: He played, he sang, he wrote. He would have been a bigger star but Jerry Lee came along. And you know what happens when someone like that comes along. You just don't stand a chance.
Il était vraiment original. Il faisait tout : il jouait, il chantait, il écrivait. Il aurait pu être une plus grande star, mais Jerry Lee est arrivé. Et vous savez ce qui se passe quand quelqu'un comme ça arrive. Vous n'avez aucune chance.

So Billy became what is known in the industry -- a condescending term, by the way -- as a one-hit wonder. But sometimes, just sometimes, once in a while, a one-hit wonder can make a more powerful impact than a recording star who's got 20 or 30 hits behind him. And Billy's hit song was called "Red Hot," and it was red hot. It could blast you out of your skull and make you feel happy about it. Change your life.
Et Billy est devenu ce qu'on appelle dans le show-biz un one-hit wonder (un terme condescendant, d'ailleurs). Mais parfois, quelques fois, une fois de temps à autre, un one-hit wonder peut avoir davantage d'impact qu'une star qui a eu 20 ou 30 tubes. Et la chanson de Billy s'appelait "Red Hot", et c'était vraimet chaud bouillant [red hot]. Ça vous expulsait hors de votre crâne et vous sentir heureux. Changer votre vie.

He did it with style and grace. You won't find him in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He's not there. Metallica is. Abba is. Mamas and the Papas -- I know they're in there. Jefferson Airplane, Alice Cooper, Steely Dan -- I've got nothing against them. Soft rock, hard rock, psychedelic pop. I got nothing against any of that stuff, but after all, it is called the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Billy Lee Riley is not there. Yet.
Il l'a fait avec style et grace. Vous ne e trouverez pas dans le Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Il n'y est pas. Metallica y est. Abba y est. Les Mamas and the Papas (je sais qu'ils y sont). Jefferson Airplane, Alice Cooper, Steely Dan (je n'ai rien contre eux). du soft rock, du hard rock, de la pop psychédélique. Je n'ai rien contre tous ces trucs, mais après tout, ça s'appelle le Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Billy Lee Riley n'y est pas. Pas encore.

I'd see him a couple times a year and we'd always spent time together and he was on a rockabilly festival nostalgia circuit, and we'd cross paths now and again. We'd always spend time together. He was a hero of mine. I'd heard "Red Hot." I must have been only 15 or 16 when I did and it's impressed me to this day.
Je le voyais environ deux fois par an et on passait toujours un peu de temps ensembles. Il était dans le circuit des festivals genre nostalgiques et on se croisait encore et encore. On passait toujours du temps ensembles. C'était un de mes héros. J'avais entendu "Red Hot". Je devais avoir 15 ou 16 ans et ça m'avait marqué pour la vie.

I never grow tired of listening to it. Never got tired of watching Billy Lee perform, either. We spent time together just talking and playing into the night. He was a deep, truthful man. He wasn't bitter or nostalgic. He just accepted it. He knew where he had come from and he was content with who he was.
Je ne m'en suis jamais lassé. Jamais lassé de voir Billy Lee jouer, non plus. On passait le temps juste en parlant et en jouant toute la nuit. C'est un homme profond, honnête. Il n'était ni amer ni nostalgique. Il acceptait cela. Il savait d'où il venait et était satisfait d'en être arrivé là.

And then one day he got sick. And like my friend John Mellencamp would sing -- because John sang some truth today -- one day you get sick and you don't get better. That's from a song of his called "Life is Short Even on Its Longest Days." It's one of the better songs of the last few years, actually. I ain't lying.
Et un jour il tomba malade. Et comme mon ami John Mellencamp peut le chanter (parce que John a chanté des choses vraies aujourd'hui), un jour vous tombez malade et ça ne s'arrange pas. C'est dans sa chanson "Life is Short Even on Its Longest Days." C'est l'une des meilleures chansons de ces dernières années, en fait. Je ne vous mens pas.

And I ain't lying when I tell you that MusiCares paid for my friend's doctor bills, and helped him to get spending money. They were able to at least make his life comfortable, tolerable to the end. That is something that can't be repaid. Any organization that would do that would have to have my blessing.
Et je vous mens pas quand je vous dis que MusiCares a payé les frais médicaux de mon ami et l'a aidé financièrement. Ils ont pu au moins lui rendre la vie  confortable, tolérable jusqu'à la fin. C'est quelque chose qui ne se rembourse pas. Toute organisation qui fait cela aura toujours ma bénédiction.

I'm going to get out of here now. I'm going to put an egg in my shoe and beat it. I probably left out a lot of people and said too much about some. But that's OK. Like the spiritual song, 'I'm still just crossing over Jordan too.' Let's hope we meet again. Sometime. And we will, if, like Hank Williams said, "the good Lord willing and the creek don't rise."
Je vais partir maintenant. Je vais aller me faire voir ailleurs. J'ai probablement oublié un tas de gens et dis trop à propos de certains. Mais c'est pas grave. Comme dans le Sipitual "Je suis encore en train de traverser le Jourdain, moi aussi." Espérons qu'on se reverra. Un jour. Et ce sera le cas si, comme disait Hank Williams : "le Bon Dieu le veut bien et la rivière ne déborde pas".
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
JeffreyLeePierre
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2699
Age : 51
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 06/01/2011

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Lun 9 Fév - 2:38

Ah ben tiens, en prime :



pour ceux qui n'ont pas cette merveille http://www.discogs.com/Various-The-Legendary-Sounds-Of-Sun-Studios/release/3860698 Après avoir lu ce que Dylan dit de Sun et de Billy Lee Riley, vous comprendrez que c'est in-dis-pen-sa-ble. Si ça existe encore, ça coûte trois fois rien. Et pour les légions qui aiment le blues, je tiens à signaler que la troisième rondelle rappelle que Sam Phillips a aussi beaucoup enregistré la musique du Beale Street des années 50.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
used_spoon
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2136
Age : 26
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2011

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Lun 9 Fév - 12:44

Ca sonne quand même comme un discours d'Adieu non ?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Sénithé
Like a Rolling Stone


Nombre de messages : 134
Age : 36
Localisation : Lorient
Date d'inscription : 27/03/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Lun 9 Fév - 15:17

Merci pour la traduction, effectivement cela ressemble à un discours d'adieu.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
hazel
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2796
Age : 27
Localisation : Rennes
Date d'inscription : 16/01/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Lun 9 Fév - 23:04

Super boulot de traduction !

Un beau, triste, drôle, vibrant discours. Le début de la fin ? Il est long comment le Jourdain ?

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://dylanesque.cowblog.fr/
Baptiste
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2507
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Mar 10 Fév - 0:11

Un immense merci pour ce boulot cheers

Je vais relire tout ça à tête reposée Very Happy

_________________
Sing along Bob
Sing, sing along Zimmerman
J'suis cow-boy à Paname
Mais c'est la faute à Dylan
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Jack Fate
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 918
Age : 37
Date d'inscription : 21/07/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Mar 10 Fév - 0:19

Quelqu'un sur ER avait fait le parallèle entre Shadows et les American Recordings de Johnny Cash. Il y a peut être de ça. La comparaison n'est pas idiote.

Si ce discours a un goût d'adieu, c'est surement parce que Dylan n'entend pas reprendre la parole en public. Ce n'est pas une surprise, il n'était plus très bavard depuis quelques dizaines d'années. Ca ne veut pas dire qu'il va arrêter de chanter, enfin j'espère...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
gengis_khan
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1650
Age : 28
Localisation : Alpes
Date d'inscription : 25/07/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Mer 11 Fév - 0:18

used_spoon a écrit:
Transcription complète : http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-grammys-2015-transcript-of-bob-dylans-musicares-person-of-year-speech-20150207-story.html#page=3


C'est passionant : Hommages, Critiques, Dieu, Écriture.

Si quelqu'un à la vidéo...


Citation :
Oh, yeah. Critics have been giving me a hard time since Day One. Critics say I can't sing. I croak. Sound like a frog. Why don't critics say that same thing about Tom Waits? Critics say my voice is shot. That I have no voice. What don't they say those things about Leonard Cohen? Why do I get special treatment? Critics say I can't carry a tune and I talk my way through a song. Really? I've never heard that said about Lou Reed. Why does he get to go scot-free?


What have I done to deserve this special attention? No vocal range? When's the last time you heard Dr. John? Why don't you say that about him? Slur my words, got no diction. Have you people ever listened to Charley Patton or Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters. Talk about slurred words and no diction. [Inaudible] doesn't even matter.

"Why me, Lord?" I would say that to myself.

Critics say I mangle my melodies, render my songs unrecognizable. Oh, really? Let me tell you something. I was at a boxing match a few years ago seeing Floyd Mayweather fight a Puerto Rican guy. And the Puerto Rican national anthem, somebody sang it and it was beautiful. It was heartfelt and it was moving.


Bim.

cheers c'est jouissif ! le Dylan caché, muet, mystérieux prépare son ptit discours et s'explique. Il prends sa propre défense, je n'en reviens pas. quel plaisir !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
gengis_khan
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1650
Age : 28
Localisation : Alpes
Date d'inscription : 25/07/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Mer 11 Fév - 1:08

Merci beaucoup pour la traduction car je n'aurais pas eu la patience de lire tout le discours en anglais ce soir !

Et bien, je suis abasourdi. C'est un discours marquant, sans aucun doute, marquant par le fait que ce vieux Dylan parle en public !! il va neiger sur Jéricho, en attendant que notre chanteur termine de traverser le pont... nous on sera toujours là et on attendra la dernière mesure, ou bien la dernière vague qui emportera tout
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Jack Fate
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 918
Age : 37
Date d'inscription : 21/07/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Ven 13 Fév - 22:07

La suite (il ne s'arrête plus) : http://www.bobdylan.com/us/news/post-musicares-conversation-bill-flanagan


-----------------------------

Post-MusiCares Conversation with Bill Flanagan
I NOTICED THAT SOME PEOPLE WHO WERE NOT AT THE EVENT READ THE TRANSCRIPT OF YOUR SPEECH AND DIDN’T GET THAT SOME OF IT WAS TONGUE IN CHEEK. WHEN YOU SAID, “WHY ME, LORD?” IN THE ROOM YOU WERE LAUGHING AND SO WAS THE AUDIENCE. IN PRINT, SOME PEOPLE THOUGHT IT WAS ALL SERIOUS.

Yeah, well you had to be there.

HOW DID YOU SELECT ALL THE PERFORMERS FOR THE MUSICARES TRIBUTE, WAS THAT DIFFICULT?

It really wasn’t. Most all of them had recorded versions of those songs over the years. Garth had made “Make You Feel My Love” a number one hit. Tom Jones had done an incredible version of “What Good Am I.” Beck had recorded “Leopard skin Pillbox Hat." Bonnie had recorded astonishing versions of “Standing in the Doorway” and “Million Miles." John Doe had done “Pressin’ On” for that movie and that was just a once in a lifetime recording. Los Lobos had also recorded “On a Night Like This,” same thing with Crosby, Stills and Nash. I had heard them do a beautiful version of “Girl From The North Country." So no, it wasn't that hard. I’d even seen Alanis Morissette sing “Subterranean Homesick Blues” somewhere and I couldn't believe she got that so right, something I’d never been able to do. Neil of course, he’s been doing “Blowin’ In the Wind” for a while and he does it the way it should be done and that song needed to be there. Some people called up right away and wanted to be on the show, so Don Was found a few songs for them. But mostly, they were all recorded versions that we were hearing except maybe for Aaron Neville's version of “Shooting Star.” I could always hear him singing that song. He’s recorded other songs of mine, all great performances, but for some reason I kept thinking about “Shooting Star,” something he’s never recorded but I knew that he could. I could always hear him singing it for some reason, even when I wrote it. I mean, what can you say? He's the most soulful of singers, maybe in all of recorded history. If angels sing, they must sing in that voice. I just think his gift is so great. The man has no flaws, never has. He’s always been one of my favorite singers right from the beginning. “Tell it Like it Is," that could be my theme song. It’s strange, because he’s the kind of performer that can do your songs better than you, but you can’t do his better than him. Really, you can’t say enough about Aaron Neville. We won’t see his likes again. I wanted to get hold of Eric, he’s recorded a lot of my songs too, all great versions. But I didn’t want to impose on him, because I don’t think he’s performing anymore. Rod’s done some early songs of mine as well. I just didn’t think to ask him - I probably should have. There were others, Toots and the Maytals, Chrissie Hynde, Stevie Wonder, even the Rolling Stones. But it gets overwhelming after a while and you just can’t get to everybody.

WHAT WAS THAT THING ABOUT MERLE, SOUNDS LIKE YOU WERE DISSING HIM, WHAT WAS THAT ABOUT?

No, not at all, I wasn’t dissing Merle, not the Merle I know. What I was talking about happened a long time ago, maybe in the late sixties. Merle had that song out called “Fighting Side of Me” and I’d seen an interview with him where he was going on about hippies and Dylan and the counter culture, and it kind of stuck in my mind and hurt, lumping me in with everything he didn't like. But of course times have changed and he’s changed too. If hippies were around today, he’d be on their side and he himself is part of the counter culture … so yeah, things change. I’ve toured with him and have the highest regard for him, his songs, his talent - I even wanted him to play fiddle on one of my records and his Jimmie Rodgers tribute album is one of my favorites that I never get tired of listening to. He’s also a bit of a philosopher. He’s serious and he’s funny. He’s a complete man and we're friends these days. We have a lot in common. Back then, though, Buck and Merle were closely associated; two of a kind. They defined the Bakersfield sound. Buck reached out to me in those days, and lifted up my spirits when I was down, I mean really down - oppressed on all sides and down and that meant a lot, that Buck did that. I wasn’t dissing Merle at all, we were different people back then. Those were difficult times. It was more intense back then and things hit harder and hurt more.

LEIBER AND STOLLER TOO?

Yeah, them too.

WHAT DID YOU THINK OF BRUCE’S PERFORMANCE?

Incredible! He did that song like the record, something I myself have never tried. I never even thought it was worth it. Maybe never had the manpower in one band to pull it off. I don’t know, but I never thought about it. To tell you the truth, I’d forgotten how the song ought to go. Bruce pulled all the power and spirituality and beauty out of it like no one has ever done. He was faithful, truly faithful to the version on the record, obviously the only one he has to go by. I’m not a nostalgic person, but for a second there it all came back, Peckinpah, Slim Pickens, Katy Jurado, James Coburn, the dusty lawless streets of Durango, my first wife, my kids when they were small. For a second it all came back … it was that powerful. Bruce is a deep conscientious cat and the evidence of that was in the performance. He can get to your heart, my heart anyway.

HE PLAYED SOME EXPLOSIVE GUITAR THAT WASN’T ON THE ORIGINAL RECORDING.

Yeah, well that’s just Bruce being Bruce. He’s got to remind people that he can play that thing. It wasn't incessant though. It didn’t detract from the song. He brought it in quick and pulled it back quick. He definitely knows when and how to stick something in and then move it back. He’s a great performer all around.

DID YOU REALLY MEAN WHAT YOU SAID ABOUT THE CRITICS? CERTAINLY NOT ALL OF THEM GET ON YOUR NERVES?

No, not at all, I got no bitterness towards critics. Like Elvis said, “I know they have a job to do.” Some critics are better than others … some know how to write better, think better, some understand more of what they’re seeing and hearing better … some are more experienced in life. There are all kinds of critics … they’re not all on the same level. And sometimes, if they’re not saying bad things about you, you don’t really count. It’s nice to have their support, but then on a lot of different levels, it really doesn’t matter one way or another. The people will decide. Some seem to do a lot of griping for no reason, but you have to be sort of understanding. They don’t have any idea what it takes to be on a public stage and couldn’t do what you do not even for one single second. I particularly don’t like the ones who talk down with that attitude of superiority, like they know and you don’t. It’s nice to have their support, but if you don’t, you can’t let it bother you, they’re not players. I have no bitterness towards any of them, not at all.

WHAT WAS THAT THING ABOUT THE BLUES BEING A COMBINATION OF STRAUSS WALTZES AND ARABIC VIOLINS? WHERE DID YOU GET THAT?

I read it in a musicology book. In the 16 or 1700’s there were African tribal wars and instead of slaughtering their enemies like they would do today, the African chiefs roped up their captives and sold them as slaves to Arab slave traders, who were basically middlemen in the slave trading business. Then the slaves had to be marched to where the ships were at the landings; Dutch ships, English ships, Spanish ships, whatever. And that march was a long hard tedious journey, sometime covering hundreds of miles. The Arabs played their violins at night around campfires. And that sound must have drifted into their dreams. A lot of these slaves died before they even got to the boats. When they got to the ports they’d be sold to the sea captains, then they’d make another long journey over the water to the New World. Hard to tell how many of them actually survived from the whole ordeal. Agents in America would buy the slaves from the sea captains, then the agents would sell them to plantation owners. In the new world, they’d hear a lot of minuets played at plantation parties … that’s sort of how it happened according to the book, two different influences, it was so interesting. The 12 bar blues pattern, that's something else. That evidently comes out of field hollers, where one guy sings a line and a whole bunch of others repeat that line and maybe after that there is a third different line. It all gets mixed up. I can’t remember everything in the book, but this one chapter intrigued me. It pertained to the Delta blues and for that type of music it made sense. North Carolina stuff and Georgia and Florida songs are different - have less of a twang and are more melodic, seem to have more of a waltz minuet vibe, maybe because of who the slaves were and what they were exposed to along the way, musically speaking. The Delta blues has always been eerie and suspenseful, middle eastern in tone, so to me it made sense. I’ve always had a feeling for the blues, even back when I was a little boy … before I even knew what it was … mostly the sound of the Delta blues, because it’s probably in my DNA. I guess I must have both Arab in me and waltz time European blood as well.

YOU TALKED ABOUT ROCK & ROLL ENDING IN THE EARLY SIXTIES AND I TAKE YOUR POINT - THE EARLY ROCK & ROLL WAS DISPLACED BY THE BRITISH INVASION AND MOTOWN. BUT THE HALL OF FAME TAKES A BROADER VIEW - THAT ALL THE MUSIC THAT GREW OUT OF THAT FIRST EXPLOSION, FROM LED ZEPPELIN TO P-FUNK TO TOM WAITS ARE BRANCHES ON THE TREE OF ROCK & ROLL AND DESERVE TO BE REPRESENTED IN THE HALL OF FAME. YOU DON’T BUY IT?

I don’t buy what I don’t need, but I see your point. Perhaps mine is more of a pedantic point of view, maybe one I ought not have.

ARE THERE ANY OTHER PERFORMERS BESIDES BILLY LEE RILEY THAT YOU CAN RECOMMEND FOR THE HALL OF FAME?

Yeah sure, Willy DeVille for one, he stood out, his voice and presentation ought to have gotten him in there by now.

I AGREE WITH YOU, MAYBE HE’S BEEN OVERLOOKED. HE CARRIED A LOT OF HISTORY. THE DRIFTERS, BEN E. KING, SOLOMON BURKE, STREET CORNER DOO WOP AND JOHN LEE HOOKER WERE ALL THERE IN WHAT HE DID AND HOW HE PERFORMED.

I think so too.

YOU SUGGESTED THAT SOME OF THE ACTS IN THE HALL OF FAME MIGHT NOT BE TRUE ROCK & ROLL. YOU MENTIONED THE MAMAS AND THE PAPAS, ABBA, ALICE COOPER. I HAVE TO STICK UP FOR STEELY DAN. NOT EVERYTHING THEY DID WAS ROCK & ROLL BUT “BODHISATTVA,” “SHOW BIZ KIDS,” “MY OLD SCHOOL” - THOSE SONGS ROCKED LIKE A BASTARD.

Yeah they might have rocked like a bastard, and I’m not saying that they didn’t, but put on any one of those records and then put on “In The Heat of the Moment” by Willy or “Steady Driving Man” or even “Cadillac Walk." I’m not going to belittle Steely Dan but there is a difference.

Read a transcript of Bob Dylan's MusiCares speech at Rolling Stone.



Read more: http://www.bobdylan.com/us/news/conversation-bill-flanagan#ixzz3ReaTfgFe
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
redmoney
Like a Rolling Stone
avatar

Nombre de messages : 122
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2012

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Sam 14 Fév - 11:47

Ben voilà on les a nos Chroniques vol. 2..!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
LouisTheKing
Only A Hobo
avatar

Nombre de messages : 31
Date d'inscription : 08/11/2013

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Jeu 19 Mar - 12:40

Salut à tous!

Le discours est traduit en entier dans le dernier R&F.

On a déjà notre traduction sur le forum mais c'est toujours sympa de garder un souvenir papier!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
hazel
This Land Is Your Land
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2796
Age : 27
Localisation : Rennes
Date d'inscription : 16/01/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Jeu 19 Mar - 13:13

On a vérifié si c'était pas une copie de notre traduction ? Sinon y a du procès dans l'air ! Very Happy

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://dylanesque.cowblog.fr/
LouisTheKing
Only A Hobo
avatar

Nombre de messages : 31
Date d'inscription : 08/11/2013

MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   Jeu 19 Mar - 13:54

hazel a écrit:
On a vérifié si c'était pas une copie de notre traduction ? Sinon y a du procès dans l'air ! Very Happy


J'y ai pensé mais non, les textes sont différents Very Happy
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Dylan parle   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Dylan parle
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 2Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Bob Dylan, le livre 100 chansons de légendes
» [Red Lions 94] parle(nt) de Mysa
» Bob Dylan et l'harmonica
» [Interview] Bill parle de l'enregistrement d'Arthur und die Minimoys 2
» Bob Dylan Clip:Scarlett Johansson

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Shelter From The Storm :: Généralités :: L'ACTUALITE-
Sauter vers: